Understanding Parkinson’s disease hallucinations and delusions
Understanding Parkinson’s disease hallucinations and delusions

How to Get Help

Getting help starts with having a conversation

Whether you’re a caregiver or a person living with Parkinson’s, getting help starts with having a conversation about hallucinations and delusions related to Parkinson’s. Although it can be difficult, talking to a Parkinson’s specialist—and each other—about what you’re experiencing is an important first step.

TALKING TO YOUR LOVED ONE

If you are a caregiver for someone with Parkinson’s, it’s important to talk about what you are observing. Your loved one may find it difficult to share their experiences—or they may not realize these experiences aren’t real.

TALKING TO A PARKINSON’S SPECIALIST

A Parkinson’s specialist can help you determine if there are treatment options, such as counseling and/or medication, that are right for you. But they may be waiting for you to start the conversation.

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO TALK TO YOUR PARKINSON’S SPECIALIST

These experiences may be a symptom of your Parkinson’s. A Parkinson’s specialist is the best person to help you find answers, but they may be waiting for you to start the conversation.

People often don’t tell their Parkinson’s specialist about their symptoms, which can make them difficult to diagnose. But early signs of hallucinations and delusions should not be ignored for a number of reasons.

WORSENING OF SYMPTOMS

It may get harder for the people who experience hallucinations and delusions related to Parkinson’s to identify whether or not what they’re experiencing is real.

CHANGES AT HOME

Hallucinations and delusions can be stressful for both the person experiencing them as well as their caregiver. These symptoms may also increase the need for additional assistance and support.

“We were relieved when the doctor told us there may be ways to help manage these symptoms.”
Actor Portrayal

A GUIDE TO STARTING THE CONVERSATION

If any or all of the statements below apply to you, tell your Parkinson’s specialist at your next appointment. To read additional questions, download a full discussion guide below.

PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S
  • I sometimes feel out of touch with reality.
  • Others tell me what I am hearing, seeing, or sensing (e.g. people, animals, or objects) are not actually there (hallucinations).
  • I have beliefs or fears that a loved one (perhaps a spouse, caregiver, or friend) is stealing from me or being unfaithful (delusions).
CAREGIVERS
  • I have observed my loved one interacting with things, seeing things, or sensing things that are not there (hallucinations).
  • My loved one has had false beliefs toward me or others, such as believing someone is stealing from them or being unfaithful (delusions).
  • These experiences have affected our daily lives and/or our relationship.
LEARN MORE ABOUT TREATMENT OPTIONS
There may be treatment options, such as counseling and/or medication. Talk to a Parkinson’s specialist to find out if there is an option that is right for you.
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